2019 Arnedia Smith Outstanding Undergraduate Paper

2019 Arnedia Smith Outstanding Undergraduate Paper

2019 Arnedia Smith Outstanding Undergraduate Paper

Alli Evans

Ohio University

Pictured from left to right, Amy Restorick Roberts, (OAGE Awards Chair), and Alli Evans

“Developing resident relationships in nursing homes”

Studies have shown that building relationships is important for maintaining and improving health, but there has not been a narrative account of how these relationships are developed in elder care facilities. The purpose of this qualitative study is to obtain a better understanding of how adults living in nursing facilities develop new relationships with other residents. Results will look at strategies for receiving social support and building meaningful relationships. The stories I have collected present the real faces of the aging population, and demonstrate the many opportunities we have to grow meaningful relationships in elder care facilities. By understanding these relationships, we can foster more successful relationships in and out of skilled nursing facilities, which might lead to better outcomes in health and well-being for the growing elderly population.

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Nominations

 

OAGE accepts nominations of individuals in Ohio to be recognized for their contributions in the areas of education, research, and practice. For more information, click on the links below.

 

2019 Dr. Jerome Kaplan Outstanding Graduate Paper

2019 Dr. Jerome Kaplan Outstanding Graduate Paper

2019 Dr. Jerome Kaplan Outstanding Graduate Paper

Barbara T. Hodgdon, MS

The Ohio State University

Pictured from left to right: Amy Restorick Roberts (OAGE Awards Chair) and Barbara Hodgdon

“The influences of work-family spillover on filial and sandwiched caregiver’s psychosocial well-being”

There has been a documented increase in the numbers of sandwiched and filial caregivers in the United States. However, past studies have overlooked the impact of work and family overload on these caregivers’ well-being. This study investigated the moderating influences of the quality and directionality of work-family spillover on the well-being of 180 sandwiched and filial caregivers from the second wave of Midlife in the United States Survey. Regression analyses showed that sandwiched caregivers with high level of negative work-to-family spillover exhibited higher negative affect than filial caregivers with low and high levels of negative work-to-family spillover and sandwiched caregivers with low level of negative work-to-family spillover. Sandwiched caregivers with high level of negative family-to-work spillover exhibited higher level of negative affect and lower level of self-acceptance than other caregivers. Findings can inform programs at work that reduce work-family spillover, create supportive work environments, and promote caregiver well-being.

Corresponding Author: Barbara T. Hodgdon, M.S. The Ohio State University Department of Human Sciences Columbus, OH 43210 E-mail: hodgdon.9@osu.edu Master’s Thesis Advisor: Jen D. Wong , Ph.D. The Ohio State University, Department of Human Sciences, Columbus, OH 43210. Acknowledgement: The MIDUS II research was supported by a grant from the National Institute on Aging (P01- AG020166) to conduct a longitudinal follow-up of the MIDUS I investigation.

Nominations

 

OAGE accepts nominations of individuals in Ohio to be recognized for their contributions in the areas of education, research, and practice. For more information, click on the links below.

 

2019 Best Conference Theme Paper

2019 Best Conference Theme Paper

2019 Best Conference Theme Paper

Sara Stemen, MGS

Miami University

Pictured from left to right: Amy Restorick Roberts (OAGE Awards Chair) and Sara Stemen

“Breaking down ageism: Social barriers and steps toward achieving a third demographic dividend”

The modernization of societies around the globe has resulted in “the demographic transition”, a series of stages marked by shifts from agrarian economies, accompanied by high fertility and mortality rates, to industrialized economies with falling fertility and mortality rates due to changes in public health and sociocultural values. The demographic transition has resulted in two demographic dividends or benefits from an aging population. The first dividend occurs when previously high rates of fertility pair with decreased mortality rates to create a large ratio of working aged individuals to non-working aged individuals. The second dividend is marked by individuals surviving into old age with accumulated wealth. Recently, gerontologists have explored the possibility of achieving a third demographic dividend whereby disease prevention and increased roles for older persons lead to better health and continued social contributions in old age. Missing from discussions around demographic dividends, however, has been the impact of ageism. This paper highlights an original conceptual model which illustrates how ageism moderates the relationship between key societal investments and the third demographic dividend. Furthermore, resources for combating ageism will also be discussed.

Nominations

 

OAGE accepts nominations of individuals in Ohio to be recognized for their contributions in the areas of education, research, and practice. For more information, click on the links below.