2021 OAGE Aging and Innovation Student Award

2021 OAGE Aging and Innovation Student Award

2021 OAGE Aging and Innovation Student Award

Isabella Slaubaugh

Kent State University at Stark

Proposal title: “Deliverance: Resident Mental Health Tracker”

A mental health app is proposed for older adults in long-term care (LTC) facilities. This app will have several features to help with the unavoidable emotional decline during a pandemic. First, the app will have a daily wellness tracker for the user as well as tracking their emotions for the day. The information can be shared with nurses, doctors, and psychologists to alert them when a user may be emotionally declining. Secondly, the app will provide a calendar where the staff will upload daily activities so the residents could select which activity interests them. Once the activity starts, the staff can mark down attendance so the facility can track the social interaction of each resident. After the activity, the resident will be able to rate the activity and pick an emotion to match how they felt afterward. Lastly, there will be daily inspiration posted in the app. This will encourage positivity when the user opens the app. The family members can also download the app to send texts or video messages to the user to encourage them. This is especially important for LTC residents to know they are being thought of.

Nominations

 

OAGE accepts nominations of individuals in Ohio to be recognized for their contributions in the areas of education, research, and practice. For more information, click on the links below.

 

2021 Arnedia Smith Outstanding Undergraduate Paper

2021 Arnedia Smith Outstanding Undergraduate Paper

2021 Arnedia Smith Outstanding Undergraduate Paper

Christian Stephens

Ohio State University

Paper Title: “The Relationship between Socioeconomic Factors and Nutritional Intake in Older Female Cancer Survivors”

This study sought to examine the nutritional intake, self-rated health, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of older female cancer survivors with respect to household income and educational attainment. The majority of participants (n=171) were white (90%) and breast cancer survivors (68%). Results indicated that participants, on average, had less than ideal diet quality and low HRQoL. Educational attainment was found to be associated with both nutritional intake and HRQoL. In contrast, income was found to not be associated with nutritional intake or HRQoL. The importance of nutritional intake in promoting disease-free cancer survivorship, and the associations between social factors and health-promoting lifestyle behaviors, need to be recognized and further explored. The health outcomes of older female cancer survivors could be improved if nutritional intake were tracked throughout survivorship, and educational interventions to promote healthy behaviors and improve health literacy were delivered.

Nominations

 

OAGE accepts nominations of individuals in Ohio to be recognized for their contributions in the areas of education, research, and practice. For more information, click on the links below.

 

2021 Dr. Jerome Kaplan Outstanding Graduate Paper: Honorable Mention

2021 Dr. Jerome Kaplan Outstanding Graduate Paper: Honorable Mention

2021 Dr. Jerome Kaplan Outstanding Graduate Paper: Honorable Mention

Amanda M. MacNeil

Cleveland State University

Paper Title: “Understanding the Illness Experience of Veterans with Dementia: Key Areas to Consider and Their Relation to Depressive Symptoms”

Veterans with dementia are a growing population because of unique occupational-related factors, experiences and health comorbidities, are at an increased risk of developing depressive symptoms throughout their life. This paper stresses the importance and the ability of veterans with dementia to self-report upon aspects of their illness experience and is guided by a conceptual framework to look into five key areas of the illness experience: objective cognitive impairment, perceived memory difficulty, perceived functional difficulty, dyadic relationship strain, and depressive symptoms. This paper also assesses each of these areas and the relationships between them and as well as their impact on depressive symptoms in hopes to guide future work in understanding the illness experience of the unique population of veterans with dementia.

Nominations

 

OAGE accepts nominations of individuals in Ohio to be recognized for their contributions in the areas of education, research, and practice. For more information, click on the links below.

 

2021 Dr. Jerome Kaplan Outstanding Graduate Paper

2021 Dr. Jerome Kaplan Outstanding Graduate Paper

2021 Dr. Jerome Kaplan Outstanding Graduate Paper

Morgan Minyo

Cleveland State University

Paper Title: “Self-Reported Behavioral Symptoms of Persons with Dementia: A Pilot Study Examining Individual’s Perceived Illness Experience”

The current pilot study examined the feasibly of persons with dementia (PWDs) providing self-reported behaviors and behavioral-related distress to address gaps within the literature on the illness experience of behavioral symptoms. Data from a sample of 12 persons with mild to moderate dementia residing in a long-term memory care facility. Results found that persons with mild to moderate dementia were able to provide reliable (=.91) self-reported data concerning their own behaviors and behavioral-related distress with variability among responses. The most frequently self-reported behaviors experienced included agitation (66.7%) and complaining/criticizing things (58.3%) while the least reported behaviors were refusing to be left alone (8.3%) and yelling/swearing (8.3%). The highest behavioral distress reported was agitation (58.3%) while the least was wandering (8.3%). Future research needs to continue examining the illness experience of behaviors and behavioral distress of PWDs to continue theoretical development on the illness experience, understand how these behaviors and/or distress could be related to PWDs’ well-being, and aid the development of non-pharmacological intervention.

Nominations

 

OAGE accepts nominations of individuals in Ohio to be recognized for their contributions in the areas of education, research, and practice. For more information, click on the links below.

 

2020 Best Conference Theme Paper

2020 Best Conference Theme Paper

2020 Best Conference Theme Paper

Adaline Cook

Youngstown State University

Promoting Healthy Aging using the Amazon Echo Dot

Maintaining the health and well-being of the growing older adult population is a public health priority. Technology is rapidly changing for all age groups and has the potential to improve health behaviors among older adults. Through various types of technology, older adults have the potential to improve their health by doing cognitive exercises, physical exercises, and relaxation techniques. By using technology, older adults are able to have access to various applications or skills that can support healthy behavior. This paper explains the importance of these behaviors and shows how voice-activated technology, like the Amazon Echo Dot, has the ability to promote healthy aging in older adults.

Nominations

 

OAGE accepts nominations of individuals in Ohio to be recognized for their contributions in the areas of education, research, and practice. For more information, click on the links below.

 

2020 Dr. Jerome Kaplan Outstanding Graduate Paper

2020 Dr. Jerome Kaplan Outstanding Graduate Paper

2020 Dr. Jerome Kaplan Outstanding Graduate Paper

Athena Koumoutzis, MA

Miami University

Risk factors for poor health behaviors among family caregivers: The role of demographic characteristics and family context.

Athena Koumoutzis and Kelly E. Cichy

Overeating and obesity are major public health issues in the United States.  Health problems linked to obesity include: Type 2 diabetes, various cancers, stroke, and joint disease. Almost 15 million individuals serve as informal caregivers to older adults (Wolff, Spillman, Freedman, & Kasper, 2016) and 18% of children in the United States have a developmental disability (Zablotsky et al., 2019) that requires extended care. Prior literature has found that caregivers are at risk of engaging in poor health behaviors, such as emotional eating (i.e., eating in response to stressors and negative affect; MacDougall & Steffen, 2017; Tomiyama, Finch, & Cummings, 2015), to cope and self-medicate with the associated stress of providing caregiving assistance (MacDougall & Steffen, 2017).  To our knowledge, a limited amount of research has focused on emotional eating in family caregivers (MacDougall & Steffan, 2017) or has only focused on weight gain as an outcome of caregiver stress (Fredman & Daly, 1997). 

The present study addresses this gap in the literature by examining how caregiver characteristics (i.e., age, gender, and BMI) are associated with emotional eating among family caregivers. Using Lazarus and Folkman’s (1984) Transactional Model of Stress and Coping Model, this study examines the associations between caregiver characteristics (i.e., age, gender, & BMI) and emotional eating, including the extent to which family strain mediates these associations.  Data are from the MIDUS 3 dataset (N = 326) and include family caregivers of older adults and children with health care needs (M = 62.88, SD = 10.28).  Female caregivers (M=4.27, SD=2.02) were more likely than male caregivers (M=3.18, SD=1.38) to engage in emotional eating. There were no age differences in propensity to engage in emotional eating. ANOVA results indicated that obese caregivers (M = 4.68, p < .0001) were the most likely to engage in emotionally eating.

Results also indicated that family strain significantly mediated the association between caregiver age and emotional eating. Linear regression analyses indicated that female gender predicted emotional eating, although family strain did not mediate the association between gender and emotional eating. Similarly, after controlling for family strain as a mediator, higher BMI was still significantly associated with emotional eating, suggesting that BMI is a strong predictor of emotional eating among family caregivers regardless of present family strain. Interventions targeted at managing family strain, particularly for younger, female caregivers, could improve coping and decrease poor health behaviors.

 

References

Fredman, L., & Daly, M. P. (1997). Weight change: An indicator of caregiver stress. Journal of Aging and Health, 9(1), 43–69.doi.org/10.1177/089826439700900103

Lazarus, R. S., & Folkman, S. (1984). Stress, appraisal, and coping. New York: Springer.

MacDougall, M., & Steffen, A. (2017). Self-efficacy for controlling upsetting thoughts and emotional eating in family caregivers. Aging & Mental Health, 21(10), 1058–1064.
doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2016.1196335

Tomiyama, A. J., Finch, L. E., & Cummings, J. R. (2015). Did that brownie do its job? Stress, eating, and the biobehavioral effects of comfort food. In Emerging Trends in the Social and Behavioral Sciences (pp. 1–15). American Cancer Society. doi.org/10.1002/9781118900772.etrds0324

Wolff, J. L., Spillman, B. C., Freedman, V. A., & Kasper, J. D. (2016). A National Profile of Family and Unpaid Caregivers Who Assist Older Adults With Health Care Activities. JAMA Internal
Medicine, 176(3), 372–379. doi.org/10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.7664

Zablotsky, B., Black, L. I., Maenner, M. J., Schieve, L. A., Danielson, M. L., Bitsko, R. H., Blumberg, S. J., Kogan, M. D., & Boyle, C. A. (2019). Prevalence and Trends of Developmental
Disabilities among Children in the United States: 2009–2017. Pediatrics, 144(4).
doi.org/10.1542/peds.2019-0811

Nominations

 

OAGE accepts nominations of individuals in Ohio to be recognized for their contributions in the areas of education, research, and practice. For more information, click on the links below.